Hay There: Catching up on Food Trends for ’12

A fork next to a serving of lutefisk at a Norwegian celebration at Christ Lutheran Church in Preston, Minnesota. Photo: Jonathunder/ Wikimedia Commons

A fork next to a serving of lutefisk at a Norwegian celebration at Christ Lutheran Church in Preston, Minnesota. Photo: Jonathunder/Wikimedia Commons.

By: WFAE’s Roger Sarow

One of the joys of the holidays and new year season is the memory of food and places from family gatherings of years ago.

I had a home-and-food memory on a recent Sunday. I was riding through the North Carolina woods under brilliant blue skies and surprisingly moderate temperatures for the first of January. I was struck with the landscape’s similarity to Northern Wisconsin during family trips of my youth (which I usually found to be crashingly boring).

At that moment, I heard a great food story on Weekend Morning Edition, and I want to share it with you.

According to the NPR story, one of the hot food trends in 2012 will be Nordic food.

Not the lutefisk (whitefish soaked in lye) and lefse (potato flatbread) that I remember from church suppers of my youth. We will be hearing about moss flavors….maybe the tempting tastes of hay!

Take a listen.

Did you grow up with the influence of Nordic cooking? We at WFAEats would love to hear your stories, recipies…..coping strategies when faced with plate of lutefisk.  Just post to us, and we’ll share!

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1 Comment

Filed under Food, Quirky

One response to “Hay There: Catching up on Food Trends for ’12

  1. Bill Lynch

    I grew up in Chatfield, Minnesota (15 miles from Preston, MN). The notorious Lutefisk Suppers were a staple Holiday tradition in my little town. My family owned a grocery store and every year, we’d receive our supply of lutefisk. Because of the smell and jelly-like texture, we’d usually find a ‘rookie’ stock boy to stock the meat case with the Lutefisk.

    Being Irish Catholic, we never had lutefisk, but my father would often attend the lutefisk suppers held at the various Lutheran churches… my dad was the only human being who willingly ate lutefisk. My mother never, ever went with him to these events.

    My wife, Denise, was raised in a traditional Minnesota-Swedish family and lutefisk was served at least once each year. She and her siblings would be forced to try it every year, and every year they’d try to think of new ways to hide it, feed it to the dog, etc.

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